STEM programs crucial to the future

Jennifer Byrd

Volunteer Writer 

Logan Brown shows off this physics project concerning electro-magnetic energy. Photo by Dennis Gosnell

 

Cell phones, computers, automobiles, and the energy that powers them are just a few of the products that are produced that require Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) knowledge.

STEM fields are crucial in our rapidly advancing technological world. Without the students, educators and employees that work in these areas, we would not have any of the luxuries we have today.

The problem currently being addressed by educators and politicians is the rapid decline in the U.S., standing as a STEM leader. According to the World Economic Forum, the U.S. is currently 52nd in the world for quality of Science and Math Education, and a declining seventh in overall global competiveness. In stark contrast, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects STEM jobs to grow 17 percent between 2011 and 2021, with seven of the ten fastest growing occupations being STEM related.

To combat this issue, RSC Science and Engineering Dean, Dr. Wayne Jones, along with advisor Nick Bastani, have become active in creating STEM awareness in Oklahoma. According to Jones, to resume our role as technological leaders society as a whole needs a background in STEM.

Some of the ways RSC is involved with such an initiative include the 19 degrees in STEM related fields, on campus workshops, and reaching out to the younger generation that will one day become STEM leaders.

Some past projects include Teacher Workshops, the First Annual Central Oklahoma Science and Engineering Festival, and the annual summer event, Kids College. This summer over 1,600 students attended 135 classes, with many of those classes being STEM related.

It is crucial to get the future leaders of America interested in STEM at a young age. Many children love their video games, but not as many understand the technology that makes them function. To help spark their interest, RSC holds a Science Fair every year during the Spring semester for grades K-12. Jones and Bastani, also serve on the Boards at Northeast Academy for Health Sciences and Engineering, working closely with a group of young people that are about to enter college in STEM programs.

The coming decade appears to be a make or break it time for the U.S. in reference to our global impact in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. It is up to every single American to become active and encourage the youth around them to participate in these subjects.

Mr. Bastani realizes the importance of each individual in making a difference.

“As a nation we can no longer afford to be just an end user,” Bastani said.

By 15th Street News Posted in Raider Life Tagged Central Oklahoma Science And Engineering Festival, Engineering, global competiveness, kids college, , , , STEM,

Characteristics and philosophy expected of the next Rose State president

Dennis Gosnell

Assignment Editor

Characteristics and philosophy expected of the next Rose State president

During the summer Dr. Terry Britton, president Rose State College, announced his retirement, and with this announcement came the need for the Board of Regents to find his replacement.

On Aug. 14, a town hall meeting was held between the Board of Regents and those of the RSC community. Faculty and staff stood up and gave the Board of Regents their perspectives and wishes on the type of personality, type of character, and type of philosophy they would like to see in the next president.

Much was said in the way of support for the needs of the students by the faculty and staff who presented ideas concerning the needs of the students to the Board of Regents.

Following are concerns set forth during the meeting.

  • Need a president with a short-term plan to renovate appearance of the campus. Students judge a school not only by its academic standing but also by its appearance and level of maintenance.
  • Need a president who will be supportive of those who need a remedial education, and who will see the importance of catering to their unique needs.
  • Need a president that recognizes the uniqueness of Rose State students and community college students.  It would be good to see a president who teaches a class and who is in touch with the students.
  • Need a president that instills a sense of pride in the RSC community, gives the students better facilities, and who focuses on best practices in which the level of academics at RSC becomes rich.
  • Need a president who promotes STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). The development of national and international science and technology requires students to have skills in STEM; RSC needs to meet these needs and have the technology and facilities needed to give students the skills required in the current and future world of science and technology.

Other faculty and staff talked about the need for a president who understands the need for external relations with not only the community but also those in the State legislature.  The next president needs to be up to date on current education legislation and be able to work with state legislatures to create a marked difference in student’s education.

It was the wish of some of the faculty and staff to have a president with an academic background as well as an administrative background. The president represents not only the administration of the college, but all areas, including the faculty, adjunct professors, and staff.

Adjunct professors are crucial to the everyday workings of the college. Without them, the number of courses offered would be limited to the number professors on payroll. The next president should recognize and promote their role in the continuing growth of the college’s various academic programs.

At the end of the town hall meeting Joe Cole, chairman of the Board of Regents told the faculty and staff that they would try to find the college a president that had the personality and character they described.

Propelling tomorrow’s youth into a technological future

Dennis Gosnell, Assignment Editor

It is often said that the future is held in the hands of the youth, and for a country to thrive the youth of that nation must be educated and have the know-how to continue moving their nation forward. Miles Garcia, resident of Oklahoma and student at Rose State College, is one such youth. Continue reading

By 15th Street News Posted in News Tagged engneering, jet propulsion laboratory, johnson space center, mathematics, Miles Garcia, NASA, NCAS, ,

New well creates flow of ideas

By: Logan Pierce, editor-in-chief

A grant provided by Northrop Grumman Corp. allowed Rose State College to dig a well on campus during the winter break. The purpose of the well is to help educate environmental science students on issues regarding water resources.

The well is roughly 35 feet deep, with underground water deposits. Unlike surface water, the underground deposits are not susceptible to evaporation, making them a viable commodity during a drought.

Overdrawn at the water bank

new water well

A grant provided by Northrop Corp allowed RSC to dig a well on campus during winter break.

However, problems can occur with repeated years of drought. This puts a strain on underground deposits, which are used primarily for agricultural purposes. Without knowledge of how to monitor water levels and resource management, one could find themselves overdrawn at the water bank.

Students can use the well to learn how to calculate flow rates in order to use the well water, while still maintaining it, as opposed to just using it up.

The last straw

“Beneath the cap, there’s a tube that goes down the well’s full length,” Stephen Lynch, physics lab assistant said,  “It’s similar to a glass of water with a drinking straw. The water level inside the straw is equal to the outside water level.”

Lynch said that by measuring the water levels, we could determine how long it takes the well to replenish itself between uses.

When digging the well, a geological instrument gathered core soil samples. Three 10-foot-long segments were collected, and are currently stored in the physics lab. There are plans to construct a display case for the soil samples.

STEM research

The new well is one of many projects funded by the $15,000 Northrop Grumman Corp. grant provided to the campus. The grant goes to help develop Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education.

Other technology funded by the grant includes:

  • A Thermal Cycler, which assists in DNA research
  • Computational Chemistry Workstations, used in pharmaceutical and health science research
  • Bridge and load amplifier sets that stress-test load-bearing structures
  • Recertifying and maintaining a 3-D printer used in engineering model building.
By 15th Street News Posted in News Tagged core soil samples, drought, Engineering and Math education, environmental science, Northrop Grumman Corp., , STEM, , underground water deposits